Tag Archives | germany

Dortmund in red scale

 

This isn't actually Dortmund, it's a train station where we had to change trains

This isn’t actually Dortmund, it’s a station where we had to change trains

 

red scale dortmund

red scale dortmund

red scale dortmund

red scale dortmund

 

When I was living in Hamburg I went on a little adventure to Dortmund with my friend Rodrigo to see our beloved Hot Water Music. Remembering this trip makes me feel sad that I haven’t seen Rodrigo for two years, we had some awesome times in Hamburg. I had never thought about visiting the Ruhrgebiet until then. Having lived in Bavaria, the idea of visiting German industrial cities didn’t appeal to me at all, why would I go to bloody Dortmund when I could be visiting castles, mountains and lakes?! I suppose it must have been a beautiful city at some point, but 98% of the inner city was bombed during the war, and although important buildings were rebuilt during the post-war era, that wasn’t enough to restore its charm.

These photos were taken with the Lomography red scale film. I get really mixed results from it. Some photos come out great, but others way too red or too yellow. Some of the pics above have been desaturated on photoshop because it was a bit too much. I much preferred Rollei Redbird. You can see an example of a photo I took with the same camera but different red scale film here, the colours and texture are much nicer there.

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Hamburg

These photos were taken in Hamburg a couple of summers ago. The Reeperbahn is a monstrosity, but I sort of like its decadence. Despite the look of this photos, Hamburg is definitely one of the most alive cities I have ever been to, and my short time living there was crucial in feeling content with who I am again. Because of that I will be forever indebted to it.

 

reeperbahn hamburg

reeperbahn hamburg st pauli zum silbersack

st pauli hamburg

Adorno playing at Rote Flora

Adorno playing at Rote Flora

st pauli hamburg

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A book and a movie

I started reading ‘A woman in Berlin’, the anonymously published diaries of a young woman’s life in Berlin during the last days of the second World War, at some point last year and didn’t finish it until the other night. I abandoned the book for a few months because it was just too much for me at the time. I was really enjoying it, but at the same time it was depressing me, so I was forced to leave it for a bit. The diaries were first published in Germany in 1954, and they went out of print until 2003, when they became a literary success. I am not surprised readers reacted badly to it 50 years ago, it is still hard to read for someone completely distanced from the action. The author, a well-educated woman who worked in publishing, coldly relates being raped when the Red Army entered Berlin, having sex with Russian officials for food and the uncertainty and loneliness of living once one is stripped of everything once had.

After reading this I felt like it was the right time to watch ‘Germany Year Zero’, a film by Roberto Rosselini that tells the story of Edmund, a 12-year old boy who has had to grow up too fast. Motherless, with an ill father and a brother hiding from the police, Edmund and his older sister struggle to survive in a completely destroyed city. The footage of post-war Berlin is really interesting to see, especially a scene where one of Hitler’s speeches can be heard as we look at what’s left of Berlin. It really is worth seeing, even if the version I downloaded had terrible audio quality with out of sync subtitles. Also good for German student, as the dialogues are quite easy to understand.

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Hallo, ich bin deine Menstruation.

Apparently German discount supermarket chain Lidl doesn’t allow its employees to take bathroom breaks unless they are on their period, and they are required to signal this by wearing a hair-band. How bizarre. I wonder if men will start claiming to have psychological periods in order to be able to piss freely. On the right you can see Snow White rejoicing at the news.

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The Bishops live @ Atomic Cafe

Last Friday I was introduced to two new things. The first one, that inevitably led to the other one, was the “Tanzverbot”, a stupid law that says disco dancing is forbidden on Good Friday. Surely this had to be a joke abusing my ignorance of all things German. I’d never seen anything like it in Catholic Spain and the laughable expression ‘disco dancing’ had never entered my mind since those cringe-worthy English lessons in primary school. To my surprise, it happened to be true. On Friday morning I found out one of our local pubs had been fined the previous night for playing music past the stroke of midnight, which made me reconsider my plans for the night. The chosen option was to check out The Bishops‘ show at the Atomic Cafe, concert that obviously started at the stroke of midnight, wouldn’t want to mix up with that Cinderella girl.

Seeing The Bishops is like going back to a time when most of the people in the room – band included – hadn’t even been born. The twins Mark and Pete Bishop spot identical suits and Beatle-esque haircuts, and every move they make on stage, from the head-shakes to the facial expressions, seems to have been rehearsed in front of the mirror a million times before. But it’s not only the aesthetics that one could find somewhat familiar, their music is directly influenced by the rock and roll sounds of the late fifties and early sixties. Even though a lot of people will be put off by the lack of originality in their sound and the simplicity of their lyrics, The Bishops manage to capture the energy and urgency of the early days in their live show, eliminating the tough guy attitude so prevalent in modern rock and bringing back the mixture of rebelliousness and innocence that characterised the first generation of teenagers. Those who allow themselves to forget about virtuosos and pretentiousness will find it impossible not to dance along to their catchy tunes. Remember kids, rock is fun, and The Bishops sure know how to bring it. That said, I wouldn’t want to listen to them at home.

The Only Place I Can Look Is Down MP3

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